Medical Exercise Therapy

Medical Exercise Therapy was developed by Oddvar Holten (1921 – 1995), the founder of Medical Exercise Therapy (MET) and The Holten Institute in Norway. Medical Exercise Therapy has been widely adapted throughout Europe and the United States as the primary methodology for therapeutic exercise design and application.

Medical Exercise Therapy (MET) is a method of exercise prescription and progression that targets impaired tissue and dysfunctional movement using methods that are unique to each person’s strengths and weakness and dependent upon which tissues are targeted for effect. These tissues include: muscle (of course!), cartilage, tendon, and ligament.

Medical Exercise Therapy enhances the patient’s exercise experience by facilitating tailored therapeutic exercise designs that adhere to the principles of biomechanics, kinesiology, and motor control training. Medical Exercise Therapy is well-complimented by manual therapy interventions and it is implemented utilizing well-researched methodology in the design of the program that is specific for appropriate dose and dosage for each exercise depending on which tissue is targeted for treatment.

Medical Exercise Therapy integrates the principles of biomechanics, exercise physiology and functional kinesiology to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of therapeutic exercise as it targets specific tissues first for repair and remodeling, then the specific tissues ability to handle increasing biomechanical loads. As a patient is progressed through his or her individually tailored program, the correct biomechanical response to progressively increasing and complex loads within pain-free performance and response to performance is expected. Pain during exercise is unacceptable and damaging to the target tissues. At Connolly Physical Therapy, and traditionally, Medical Exercise Therapy is provided in conjunction with orthopaedic manual physical therapy including joint and soft tissue mobilization and manipulation, motor control training, postural education and exercise, and muscle rebalancing. Scientific literature unequivocally supports the view that for many musculo-skeletal conditions combining manual therapy and medical exercise therapy produce greater results in decreasing pain and dysfunction and improving function, quality of life and patient satisfaction.